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  • Writer's pictureMubbashar (Hafiz Team)

Agency and Responsibility: A Common-sense Moral Psychology

"Agency and Responsibility: A Common-sense Moral Psychology" is a book that explores the concept of agency and responsibility in moral psychology. The book is written by Christian Miller, a professor of philosophy at Wake Forest University. The book presents a comprehensive theory of agency and responsibility, arguing that these concepts are central to our understanding of morality. Miller argues that agency is the capacity to act intentionally and to control one's own actions, and that responsibility is the accountability for one's actions and their consequences. The book explores the various factors that contribute to agency and responsibility, such as cognitive processes, emotions, intentions, and social and cultural influences. Miller also examines the ways in which agency and responsibility are related to moral concepts such as character, motivation, and moral judgment. Miller draws on a wide range of sources, including philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, and the law, to support his arguments. He also presents a number of case studies and thought experiments to illustrate the concepts of agency and responsibility. The book has been well-received by critics, with many praising its clear and accessible writing style, as well as its thorough and insightful exploration of the topic. Some reviewers have found the book to be a useful resource for scholars and students of philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience. Overall, "Agency and Responsibility: A Common-sense Moral Psychology" is a thought-provoking and insightful book that explores the concepts of agency and responsibility in moral psychology. It presents a comprehensive theory of these concepts, arguing that they are central to our understanding of morality. The book is written in a clear and accessible style and draws on a wide range of sources to support its arguments. It would be a useful resource for scholars and students of philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience.


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